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Gallery: Ruger Single Action Revolvers

Gallery: Ruger Single Action Revolvers/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2a9804c_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2a9804c_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } An ode to the Ruger single action revolver, designed with classic western lines and modern innovations and materials. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! [slideshow_deploy id='217617'] Related GunDigest Articles Ruger Gallery: Six Decades of Good Gun Designs

Drills Are Tactical Skill-Killers

Drills Are Tactical Skill-Killers

What Is A Drill? Drills are a method of repeating something over and over until you can’t screw it up. Courses of fire are timed scenarios that are designed to test our skills and diagnose what we need to work on. If there is one thing that I have learned from my time using guns, professionally or otherwise, its that drills are important. Drills are a great way of perfecting your skills to the point of becoming second nature. As shooters, it is important to always advance in our skills and become faster, and more efficient. But these skills do us no good if we are not able to implement them universally and adapt to any scenario. It is always good to test your speed and proficiency under stress periodically and some courses of fire are a great way of doing this. However, a lot of courses of fire used today are modified, turned into drills, and used without question. This is the case with most trends in the tactical/self-defense community. People will follow whatever looks sexy and may make them look like they’re part of the tack-tickle club. These DRILLS are supposedly used to teach skills. But its as if the purpose of these DRILLS has been lost in translation from instructor to student through the generations. You will see people doing these courses of fire over and over until they break some time record like some kind of drill, hence why they are now called DRILLS. I intend to discuss why I think you shouldn’t use these courses of fire as drills, and how they should instead be implemented and why. I just want to start by saying that I prefer to keep things simple and stay versatile and adaptable. My method of training and practicing are based off of perfecting things that are good with all platforms and situations. This means drilling properly on the basics only and learning speed through smooth repetition. Click here to watch my video on the few drills I do train on, how I do them, and why. Drilling on timed courses of fire is quite popular for trying to teach several skills all at once, but they don’t really help you much. They are only going to build your skill in that specific course of fire. Let’s look at each course of fire and what it’s supposed to do for you/show you in theory. Click on the names to see videos of the drills being done the wrong way. Mozambique/Failure drill: Made popular through Jeff Cooper, this drill in my experience has been modified to the point of complete fantasy that is more dangerous than helpful. It is originally supposed to be done by delivering two rounds to the chest, going back to the low ready for a pause to represent assessment of results, and then delivering a quickly aimed shot to the head. I was taught this when I was in the military and I was taught to go right to the head but with no real rush, maybe even drop to a knee beforehand. This was wrong and is completely unnecessary and even wasteful and overkill if used all the time. Modern day experience and lessons in gun fighting has taught most of us veterans that two to the chest is a useless answer to a threat. In reality you should be training to shoot until the target has stopped fighting. The only time this type of response would be necessary, is when the threat just won’t stop from multiple shots and they are continuing to be a considerable threat, such as the case if they are wearing body armor. In this case, you should just do a headshot and not waste your rounds. However, most of the time you will not get feedback on your hits like in movies anyways. The only time you may see a definite involuntary physical response is if a loadbearing structure such as bone or joints are damaged or shattered. Other than that it is a purely psychological response to being shot that makes them stop. It annoys me greatly to hear people talk about how they will just use this drill and make it their standard response. That makes zero sense if you think about this statement. If you just commit to doing two to the chest and then immediately shoot them in the head before they were even able to react to the chest shots, you just wasted two rounds. A world record time on this will do nothing but prove you don’t need to waste the two rounds. If you’re so darn skilled that you can hit a moving head at any distance, why wouldn’t you just do the headshot? With this in mind, I conduct this drill sparingly, knowing that it actually takes time for a person to bleed out and that a headshot is rarely necessary to end the fight, save for the presence of body armor of course. With that being said, my method of conducting this drill is to deliver a random number of quick, aimed shots and then pause with my sights and concentration still on the threat, then I deliver an aimed shot to the head. 1-5 Drill: This drill is actually an good test for round count discipline and multiple target engagement. I usually only use this drill to test my trigger discipline once in a blue moon. It absolutely should not be something you try to mainline, though. It should only be used as a test, not as a drill. El Presidente Drill: One of the most popular Jeff Cooper drills, but also one of the most misunderstood. This drill was supposed to be a basic test of a shooters ability to engage multiple attackers with multiple rounds, reload under pressure, and continue an engagement. This was supposed to be a drill that can be modified to test people based on their different skill levels. But that was lost in translation and now its just a drill that is used to try and set records and ends up just solidifying bad habits. If you try to perfect it, this drill will only teach being static and delivering a set number of shots on each target. This has little if any practical application today and should only be used as a BASIC TEST of multiple target engagement skill. I like to deliver a random number of rounds to each target, incorporate movement to cover with the reload, and put only one round (headshots) to each target with the second follow-up to represent headshots of the still dangerous threats. Focus on accuracy, your reloads, your movement, and follow through. Fluidity of the individual skills and implementation of the basics are the main focus here. Be careful when timing this though, because you don’t want to get the idea that you have to set a world record to be considered well trained. Only use time to monitor progress, not just your overall skill level. Lessons The thing that is consistent with these courses of fire is that they are conducted from a static position, which is a terrible thing to train for. Originally the courses of fire I discussed were designed to TEST your ability to shoot accurately and quickly, transition between targets, efficiently conduct reloads, and to quickly draw and engage your targets. Trying to perfect these courses of fire can hurt your abilities if they are all you use to try to boost your individual skills. If you are wanting to have a set of skills that are universal and that are reliable in implementation, I encourage you to focus on the basics and always rotate your scenarios to keep yourself versatile and quick on your feet. Now in no way am I saying that instructors are wrong for teaching these courses of fire, but I feel like people never really question what they are doing and ask how it is actually going to work. Its like they forget that instructors are humans too, not anointed beings sent by god to teach the way of the gun. You see, as instructors your taught these drills and courses of fire, so you teach them to other people and pass on the lessons you were given. The main problem here is that these courses of fire are being treated like gospel by those inheriting them, instead of like the building blocks or tests that they are. The instructors and students try to break time records on all of them, instead of diagnosing issues after a few runs and seeing what they struggled with. But worst of all, they do very little modification to these courses of fire to set a new standard, and fail to add in variables that will test adaptability under extreme stress. This is a severe problem when we are talking about teaching people how to respond to violence with precise and effective violence with a gun. Don’t let your training and practice suffer by doing repetitive drills that don’t actually help you. Stay safe, stay vigilante, stay armed, and stay proficient. Place any questions below.

New Gun: Ruger Mark IV Standard Model

New Gun: Ruger Mark IV Standard Model

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d1135156_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d1135156_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Ruger has given fans a pistol to pine for with the release of the new Mark IV Standard. The Mark IV Standard is the latest of the enhanced line to be released. Available in 6- and 4.75-inch barrels. True to the original Mark IV Standard introduced in 1949. New Standard models feature push-button takedown. Ruger took the next step in the evolution of its popular semi-automatic rimfire pistol line last fall with the introduction of the Mark IV. Since then, the company has been full steam ahead with releasing a slew of new models to fill nearly every shooting need . And Ruger isn’t done yet. Recently, the New Hampshire gunmaker added two variations of the classic Standard model of the Mark IV to its catalog. Shooters can now choose from a 4.75-inch barreled model and a 6-inch version. Whatever the choice, the pistols are dead ringers — with upgrades — of the dandy little rimfire handgun that started it all. Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! The most notable feature of the new Standard Mark IV is the same thing that made the original so appealing: the barrel. Like the first Standard, the new version boasts the unique tapered barrel that made it stand out from much of the pistol world. Along with this, Ruger has maintained the same natural pointing grip angle that initially attracted shooters to the Mark IV and made it an intuitive shooter. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Review: The Turnbull Ruger Mark IV New Product: Ruger Mark IV .22 LR Pistol Classic Guns: The Ruger Blackhawk Revolver The traditional package of the Standard features all the enhancements of the Mark IV that even the most dyed-in-the-wool fans of the original Ruger rimfire pistol are sure to appreciate. The largest upgrade to the Ruger design is the Mark IV’s easy takedown, facilitated by a recessed button on the rear of the frame. With a push, the upper receiver tilts off the grip and the bolt slides out the rear for routine maintenance. For those familiar with Ruger’s Mark pistols in all their iterations, this is a vastly simpler process.

9mm vs .40 S&W: Is Bigger Always Better?

9mm vs .40 S&W: Is Bigger Always Better?

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Does anyone even shoot .40 S&W anymore? With the FBI going back to 9mm there has been a slew of other agencies across the nation following along and dumping the .40 S&W. .40 S&W Round The military never touched the .40 S&W, so there was never any support there. Since it only came to be because of the FBI, will we see the .40 S&W wither and die without their support? Maybe . Even without the FBI, this cartridge will still have legs for years, even decades maybe, to come. If for no other reason than that police trade in Glock 22s are FLOODING the market right now – and they’re going for CHEAP . While the .40 caliber is being phased out among government agencies, it still has a following of people loyal to it because of its powerful punch (and often superior magazine capacity to the .45 ACP). Popular Pistol Calibers But how does it stand against the faithful 9mm? Today we’re going to look at the two cartridges and see which one is better. Table of Contents Loading... .40 S&W Background First developed in 1990, the .40 S&W is one of the newer cartridges on the block.  It was developed as a joint effort between Smith & Wesson and Winchester, who were tasked by the FBI to come up with an effective round to replace their 9mm and .38 Special cartridges. Unfortunately, the .40 S&W was a round that came out of necessity – primarily the need to find a suitable replacement following the aftermath of the infamous FBI Miami Shootout in 1986 which took the life of two agents and injured five more. Side note, the Miami shootout is worth learning more about as it is one of the events that sparked radical change in firearms and tactics. The short version of the end result of the shooting: the .40 S&W was created because the FBI felt their 9mm jacketed hollow point rounds were underpowered and contributed to the agents’ deaths in Miami. What makes the debate between the 9mm and the .40 S&W more interesting than other cartridge debates is that both rounds have technically been declared the winner by the FBI. Sorry .380 ACP, your day still hasn’t come yet. The .40 S&W cartridge enjoyed two-and-a-half decades of field use, developing a nice little following in the process. But in 2014, the FBI announced that they’re returning to the 9mm thanks to better technology and ballistics that have made the once-shunned round more effective. What does the FBI’s change of heart really mean for America’s most misunderstood cartridge, also known as the .40 S&W? Anybody’s guess. The US Army entertained the idea of switching their sidearm over to the .40 S&W, but ultimately stuck with the trusty ol’ 9mm. Glock 22 in Olive Drab Comparing the 9mm and the .40 S&W The biggest advantage the 9mm has over the .40 S&W is handling. One of the main criticisms of the .40 caliber is its kick. In fact, some people downright dislike the .40 S&W because they feel it’s underpowered for the amount of recoil the cartridge produces. Here is a G19 in 9mm. 9mm g19 While most marksmen shouldn’t have any problem handling a .40 S&W, inexperienced shooters will undoubtedly have a harder time shooting the .40 S&W than the 9mm. This may not seem like a big deal for your average hobbyist squeezing off a few rounds at the range, but handling is extremely important for anyone in a self-defense or tactical situation where accuracy makes the difference between life and death. Ammo Price Another thing to keep in mind when shopping around for a 9mm or a .40 S&W is how much you’re going to be paying for ammunition. Because it’s such a popular round, you’d think 9mm cartridges tend to be cheaper and more widely available than .40 S&W rounds. Not necessarily. The folks over at Lucky Gunner did a comprehensive ballistics test on all of the popular handgun cartridges , including the 9mm and the .40 S&W. Here are the prices of three top-performing rounds in both calibers. 9mm Cartridges Remington +P 115 Grain JHP – $0.62 per round Speer Gold Dot +p 124 Grain JHP – $1.19 per round Federal Premium 124 Grain HST JHP – $1.29 per round .40 S&W Cartridges Federal Premium 165 Grain JHP Tactical Bonded – $0.78 per round Remington Ultimate Defense 180 Grain BJHP – $0.86 per round Winchester Supreme Elite 165 Grain JHP – $1.25 per round The truth is that premium 9mm ammo can do everything that a .40 S&W can. But as you can see, shooting with the best 9mm ammo isn’t going to make that big of a financial difference. Of course, if you’re just looking for run-of-the-mill cartridges to shoot at targets, you can easily find 9mm ammo for $0.15 a round – about $0.10 cheaper than your bottom-line .40 S&W rounds. Another thing to consider is availability. Because it’s not a commonly-used caliber, you might not always find the .40 S&W ammo that you’re looking for. This can be a massive pain in the neck if you’re like me and expect instant gratification. Knock-Down Power One area where the .40 S&W does trump the 9mm is power. It’s a bigger, heavier cartridge that hits a little bit harder than the 9mm. Moreover, one of the most common complaints that people have about the 9mm is that it’s a lighter bullet. Folks will throw around controversial terms like “stopping power” and remark how the 9mm offers little protection against attackers wearing thick layers of clothes. And that may be true, but in my experience, that’s a very outdated opinion of the 9mm. Shooting the popular 124 Grain HST JHP by Federal Premium Advancements in ammunition technology have helped to make the 9mm one of the most balanced cartridges on the market . You could even argue that the 9mm has evolved to become the cartridge that the .40 S&W was designed to be – a viable replacement for the .45 ACP. With that said, there’s no denying that the .40 S&W isn’t a powerful cartridge. Just take a look at this ballistics tests using Winchester Train &; Defend 180 Grain JHP, a popular .40 caliber cartridge for self-defense. .40 S&W 180 gr JHP "Winchester Train &" ; Defend As you can see, the .40 S&W is more than capable of stopping an incoming threat and should have no problem going through clothes. But a bigger diameter and greater power don’t necessarily give the .40 S&W a clear-cut win over the 9mm. The issue with the .40 caliber has always been its recoil and how much more difficult the gun is to control than the 9mm for beginners and even average shooters in some cases. New and Used Glocks From the FBI to farm towns across the nation, when a police department looks to adopt a service firearm for their officers – the number one choice by far is a Glock of some flavor. Caliber barely mattered, 9mm Glock or .40 S&W Glocks , Glock is the standard go to and for great reasons – Glocks just work. We’ve already looked at the price of ammo between these two veteran cartridges, but what about the guns themselves? Well, if you’re looking to buy new – the price difference is almost non-existent. Brownells has the Gen 4 Glock 22 for $499. They also have the Gen 4 Glock 17 for $499. So if you’re looking for a new Glock , the price won’t impact that choice much when it comes to 9mm Vs. .40 S&W. But used Glocks… As mentioned before, since the FBI is dumping the .40 S&W, most other departments across the United States are doing the same. That has caused a flood of Glocks hitting the used market. Stores, pawn shops, online sites such as GunBroker and ArmsList, just about everywhere right now you can find a barely used police trade-in Glock 22 or 23 for around $300. Buy in bulk or wait for a killer sale and you’ll find them for as low as $225! On the other hand, I rarely see even older models like the Gen 2 Glock 17 or 19 police trade-ins for less than $400. Love it or hate it, the .40 S&W isn’t going anywhere anytime soon due to this fact alone: police trade-in .40 S&W Glocks are cheap. Last Word on the 9mm vs the .40 S&W In regards to which gun is better, that depends on the needs and expectations of the shooter. If you happen to be in the market for a new handgun and you’re torn between picking a .40 S&W or 9mm, here are some key facts to consider: The .40 S&W is a powerful cartridge that offers deep penetration and good expansion. The downside is that the cartridge also packs a significant amount of recoil that can dramatically affect your aim when shooting follow-up shots, especially if you have a lightweight gun. While the 9mm can achieve similar effects as the .40 S&W, it’s with premium ammo that costs significantly more than your baseline 9mm ammunition. With regards to baseline prices, 9mm ammo is quite cheaper than run-of-the-mill .40 S&W ammo. The difference in price is less profound when looking at premium ammunition. Overall, the truth is that the .40 S&W was a great cartridge during its time – even with the recoil. But thanks to improvements in ballistics technology, the 9mm can now perform the same way as the .40 S&W has for nearly three decades. For this reason, I find the 9mm to be the superior choice when it comes to choosing a service pistol or home-defense weapon. If you’ve got any strong feelings about 9mm or .40 S&W rounds, or you’re still on team .40 cal , be sure to let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comments below!

Hop Up Your Glock: The Crux Ord Guide Rod Assembly

Those who know, hardly describe me as a Glock fanatic. In fact, I am quite pessimistic to their design in general. So, when Crux Ordnance agreed to send Battle Axe Tactical a few American made upgrades for a  4 th generation Glock 19 who was I to argue? One of these upgrades was their ACG-004  stainless steel Guide Rod Assembly (GRA). Now to state the obvious: in order to own/ carry a Glock I must not abhor them too disdainfully. As with any platform, each has its own pro’s and con’s.  In my case the benefits of a Glock platform seemed to outweigh their moderately annoying shortcomings. Thankfully, there are companies like Crux Ordnance who make “Glock perfection” a reality with their line of aftermarket modifications. They, CruxOrd parts, also happen to be made here in America. I always find that a little bit of America goes a long way (pew pew, patriotic ramblings, etcetera). Therefore, I eagerly awaited for my Cruxord modifications. Crux Ordnance makes a few claims concerning their GRA replacement: A Fluted rod designed to hold lubrication/ trap fouling The guide rod itself is oil injected and rated for 1500 rounds before re-lubrication Less surface area makes for less friction which in turn reduces the time required to complete cycling of the firearm Added weight from the steel guide rod helps to reduce muzzle flip Their first claim: fluted guide rod, seems as practical as it appeals aesthetically.  Yeah, I am saying it looks cool and functions as advertised. Although lubrication isn’t primarily a concern, with their oil injected guide rod, it is yet another creative solution to the required maintenance inherent of a steel guide rod. Again CruxOrd is on point, although I have less than 1,000 rounds through this test iteration I cannot officially attest to their 1500 round lubrication rating. Based on this testing period though, it certainly appears that they are not misleading anyone with this conservative number. Their next claim is a little more difficult to quantify without a scientific approach, for which I had neither the means, nor time to satisfy. However, I did notice reduced time during target acquisition of follow up shots. Which were measured by timed reactive target volley’s in series of 5 or more. Lastly, the reduced time during follow up shots could also be attributed to reduced muzzle flip. I noticed consistently tighter groups from 5-25 meters with the crux ordnance GRA compared to the stock one. The exaggerated comparison between shot patterns might also be evidence of how “tired” my stock springs were, and how desperately they needed to be replaced. Slightly discouraging considering this pistol has less than 5,000 rounds through it. In conclusion, CruxOrd seems to do their talking and walking in concert. Not only do their claims seem to be supported by my experience, they creatively and proactively address future maintenance issues in their design. It is difficult to find a “straight shooting” company that is not deceitfully blowing smoke for the sake of a sale. Crux Ordnance no nonsense approach to business, and their dedication to thoughtful design and application embolden their passion and set them apart from competition. If you’re GRA is tired, and in need of replacing, CruxOrd may be the solution you have been looking for.  Even if your springs aren’t ready for replacement, the modest investment ( $25.95-$35.95 depending on application) is well worth your money for a superior factory replacement. Don’t take my word for it though, visit their webpage and try them out for yourself: www. cruxord.com Derek Dutton Derek Dutton is an avid adventurer, writer, endurance athlete, firearms instructor and bearded hooligan. His experience in the special operations community has afforded him a unique perspective on combat. He energetically shares the physical/ psychological lessons he has taken from the field of battle, from within the fight as well as after, as an instructor and adventurer/writer. Multiple deployments with 3rd Ranger battalion 75th Ranger Regiment and multiple combat related injuries ultimately led to Derek’s, early, medical retirement from the Army. However, it has not quenched his spirit of perseverance, or diluted his taste for meeting life’s challenges head on. Someone who takes the Ranger Creed seriously “Never Shall I leave a fallen comrade”, Derek is giving back to wounded warriors who are working through their own transition to civilian life through an organization he has spear headed: Ranger Smash Extreme Endurance. RSEE is a team of wounded warriors whose mission is twofold: 1: Enable: veterans by mitigating the financial burden inherent of extreme sports; veterans will therefore have the opportunity to explore boundaries they never thought possible 2: Empower: veterans through camaraderie of the warrior spirit, and create a resource hub for athletes to achieve the next level of their athletic endeavors through our network of sports professionals and mentors. Learn more about him, or follow them at www.RangerSmash.com This post first appeared on SpotterUp

The 4 Best Holsters for Ruger LCR — IWB, Ankle, Concealed Carry Reviews 2020 Photo by Zorin Denu / CC BY The introduction of the LCR was a revolution in revolver technology. The LCR is a small, lightweight, and compact revolver designed for concealed carry. With that mind when choosing a holster you want to pick one that can effectively conceal the firearm. You still want a holster that is easy to access and easy to draw from. A good holster will also retain the weapon, and keep it from sliding out of the holster on accident. The Ruger LCR is a modern revolver, so the holster needs a modern design. We’ve gone ahead and found 4 of the best holsters for Ruger LCR . They’re a mix of over the waistband (OWB), inside the waistband (IWB), and ankle holsters. Take a gander! Fobus Standard Fobus RU101BH Evolution Holster for Charter Arms Boomer, Bulldog, Pitbull (except .45 ACP) / Ruger LCR All models fixed sights only, LCRx,Ruger SP101 any caliber (fixed sights only), Right Hand Belt Price: $26.99 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:47 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Outside the waistband will always be the most comfortable and natural way to carry in my opinion. The Fobus standard polymer holsters offer a comfortable, and easy way to carry your Ruger LCR. The Fobus holster is made entirely from Kydex and works with a standard paddle that is held in place by your body and pants. The Fobus holster is very lightweight and uses a passive retention system so there is no immediate retention device that has to be defeated before drawing the weapon. The holster rides high to aid in concealment of the weapon and keeps close to the body. The Ruger LCR is a lightweight, polymer frame revolver, so the Fobus polymer holster is an excellent fit for it. The holster is extremely light and is basically maintenance free. The polymer material can be cleaned via soap and water, and doesn’t require any special cleaners, or maintenance procedures. The holster is reinforced with steel, but just in the critical points. This keeps the weight and price low. The Fobus holster is incredibly comfortable for everyday wear and works with nearly any kind of modern clothing. Very few situations would make this a difficult holster to use. The simplistic nature of the Fobus polymer holster gives it very few failure points. Fobus even backs their warranty with a no questions asked guarantee. This is one of the best holsters for Ruger LCR revolvers period. Galco Ankle Lite "Galco Ankle Lite" Holster for Ruger LCR 38 Black Right Hand AL300B Price: $93.39 Price as of 08/14/2020 03:47 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Ankle carry is a fickle way to carry. It presents a number of challenges and can only be done with certain holsters and certain firearms: the Ruger LCR or J frame revolvers fit the bill. And the Galco Ankle Lite makes it easy to carry the LCR. The holster keeps the weapon nice and snugs against the ankle, and the cuff is rather wide. This wide cuff supports the weapon and keeps it from sagging, and becoming uncomfortable. The Ankle Lite ( see full specs ) uses a leather holster to protect the entire frame of the weapon, and at the same time give a light and comfortable way to support the weapon. The holster is made from center cut steer hide, so it’s tough and dependable. The area between the calf and the ankle holster is padded with sheepskin to keep it comfortable throughout the day, and more importantly this prevents chafing. The holster is outfitted with a snap that is easily defeated but keeps the weapon in place regardless of the terrain and speed of movement. If ankle-carrying is your thing, then this is one of the best Ruger LCR concealed carry holsters. Galco Ankle Lite Review Watch this video on YouTube

Summary

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